NADIA OUSSENKO

Nadia Oussenko is a choreographer, filmmaker, photographer, and dance teacher. She completed a Master of Fine Arts degree in Dance at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she discovered her desire to pursue choreography for the camera. Recently Ms. Oussenko premiered a dance documentary about Molly Shanahan/ Mad Shak's yearlong process and culmination of evening length work titled My Name is a Blackbird.

 





DURING THE CDF YEAR

In her CDF year, Nadia created a dance for the camera that explored her fear of falling and her journey towards surrender to gravity. She and filmmaker Daniel Kullman experimented in both public and private spaces as well as an array of different surfaces and structures in hopes to discover how movement, cinematography, and outside stimulus can investigate and document feelings of abandonment, anxiety, and surrender. This dance for the camera also sought to heighten the viewer's visceral sensation through exploration of voyeurism and the mover's point-of-view.

 

On Falling...

Premiere: November 11, 2009 

Music Box Theater

3733 N. Southport, Chicago

 

Nadia has also had her dance films shown at the 12th Annual ADF Dancing for the Camera Festival of Video and Dance in Durham, NC, Chicago Short Comedy Video and Film Festival , the Fifth Annual Dance For the Camera Festival at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, the Around the Coyote Film Festival in Chicago, and the Reel Dance Film Festival in Victoria, B.C.. Ms. Oussenko has also choreographed for dance festivals and concerts in Chicago such as Dance Chicago and Ameba Acrobatic and Aerial Dance Company.

 

 

 

 

On Falling... is a dance for the camera composed of vignettes related to the exploration of falling and surrender. Nadia Oussenko and filmmaker Daniel Kullman have experimented in a variety of both public and private spaces as well as an array of different surfaces and structures, discovering how movement, cinematography, outside stimulus, and costuming examines feelings of abandonment, anxiety, and surrender. This dance for the camera also seeks to heighten the viewer's visceral sensation through exploring the dynamic between voyeurism and the mover's point-of-view.  The premiere is a shared screening with Jan Bartoszek's film, Arch of Repose.