MARCEIA L. SRUGGS

Marceia L. Scruggs is a mover and creator, driven by research in Women’s/Gender studies where her dancemaking practice allows for experiential storytelling: raw, energetic, transformative experiences. Her work aims to challenge and interrogate notions of internalized self-hatred, anti-blackness and self-worth and to fully embody and normalize these experiences that constantly shape her and people like her. Marceia’s practice focuses on effort in physicality, risk, and musicality. Rebuke It is an ongoing work that investigates language in relation to Black bodies, when it is accepted and when it becomes a barrier to accessing resources in other spaces. Code-switching, repressed trauma and its translation to self-urgency, and exoticism of the black body are examined through a series of connective interludes.

As a bold, breathing, Black- female body, I am on a journey that challenges me to rewrite the pre-authored narrative written about my textured mane and pigmented skin.. Many times I hear: “She ain’t Black enough.”; “She ain’t womxn enough.”; “She is” and “she ain’t”; and constantly fed false images and ideas of Blackness daily. My work aims to challenge and interrogate these notions of internalized self-hatred, anti-blackness and self-worth. I aim to fully embody and normalize these experiences that constantly shape me and people like me. As dance scholar Takiyah Amin states “Being Black is rigorous.” With this notion, my practice focuses on effort in physicality, risk, and musicality. This is reflected in the performance of tasks on stage that correspond with an emotional parallel reflecting our daily experience of being while Black.

—Marceia L. Scruggs, Artist Statement

Photos: DJ | DJ | William Frederking | M Reid  

Video: Wills Glasspiegel and Brandon Calhoun

2019 GREENHOUSE PROGRAM 

Marceia's project during the Greenhouse program, Rebuke It, is a trilogy of investigations with the final performance being a presentation of her findings. She will continue researching the navigational politics of code-switching and how it affects every facet of black life. Using gestural, spoken word, and sound scores to serve as a device similar to the musical “interlude” of 1990s record albums, she intends to signal transition and change between aesthetic vocabularies.  

Mentor: J'Sun Howard
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